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    "Death is no more than passing from one room into another." – HELEN KELLER

Rolling Hills

Genesee County Home also known as Rolling Hills has a long tormented history. Over 1,000 deaths reportedly took place within its walls. Genesse County purchased the property in 1826 and opened its doors to the poor a year later. They took in anyone who could not support themselves including orphans, elderly, paupers and the insane. They were self-sufficient farming on 100's of acres of county owned land.

Besides being a poorhouse, it was a hospital, a prison for both men and women, a TB ward, and an insane asylum at the same time as an orphanage. By the 1950s, it was turned into a nursing home, but the residents were moved to a new facility in 1974. For twenty years, the building sat empty until 1992 when it was open as Carriage Village, a mall of unique shops. The name was changed to Rolling Hills Country Mall in January 2003, and became a co-op a year later. In September 2004, overnight ghost hunts began at Rolling Hills making it the first historical site in New York to do so.

There have been reports of figures in windows, shadows passing out of the corner of eyes and strange noises. Jason from TAPS had an interesting experience in a furnace room. A heavy metal door kept closing on him by itself. However, witness accounts such as these may end soon. The owner has supported the upkeep of the building by holding weekly Ghost Hunts. Unfortunately, due to back taxes and other financial obligations, Rolling Hills is currently in danger of foreclosing. The owner applied for National Historic Status in order to save the building, but that takes several years.

In the meantime, a benefit and contest has been planned to save Rolling Hills. On July 14th 2007 at the Days Inn in Batavia, NY there will be a benefit concert featuring Penny Whiskey along with several other bands. There will also be a cash bar, raffles, 50/50 Split Club Tickets, silent auctions, and more. All this for only $12.00! Online donations are also being accepted. For more information contact email: mcrecord@rochester.rr.com or visit the website, http://www.rollinghills-ghosthunt.com/.

There will also be a contest on July 14th. About twenty winners will have dinner with Steve Gonsalves from TAPS in September at the Days Inn in Batavia, NY. Visit the Rolling Hills website for more information on this and other ways you can help.


Source: Rolling Hills Ghost Hunt

Bloggers Choice Awards Update

I thought it was time for another update. While I'm not doing too good in three categories, I'm still maintaining sixth place in "Freakiest blogger" with 82 votes. Thanks again for your support. I can't say that enough.

I have posted a list of other paranormal/alternative sites who are also nominated with links to the blogs and categories. If your blog isn't on the list and would like it to be, let me know and I'll add it. The last day for voting was changed to October 19th. So, you still have plenty of time to get your votes in.

Good luck!

GS Question of the Week

Do you think the latest technological advance in paranormal investigation, ParanormalPC, will help or is it a waste of money? Why?

Cans of UFO

My mom forwarded this to me. This UFO structure was built at last years NYC Design and Build competition. It was completely made out of cans of food. Pretty amazing, huh?

Ropen

Papua New Guinea has been considered the real life Lost World. Many plants and animals have yet to be discovered there. But what about old species of animals? The ones that can only be seen in a picture. Josh Gates from the Sci-Fi original series Destination Truth first visited Papua New Guinea in search of an Iguanodon. It was later determined that the dinosaur was more likely a crocodile.

His next visit was to investigate the reports of another supposedly extinct dinosaur. The locals refer to it as a Ropen a.k.a. "demon flyer", but it was believe to be a Dimorphodon pterosaur. It is said to have a wing-span of about 20 ft with two leathery wings like a bat, a long tail with a flange on the end, a beak filled with teeth, razor-sharp claws and exhibits a bioluminescent glow. The Ropen is said to have a taste for decaying human flesh and has even harassed native funeral gatherings.

One of the first reports of this flying creature was made by Duane Hodgkinson who was stationed northwest of Lae, near Finschaven, PNG as part of the Army cavalry in 1944. About noon one day in August he was walking down a trail through a clearing in the forest when he was startled by a crashing in the brush. As he watched a large bird-like creature ponderously rose from the ground, circled and flew away.

The only evidence Gates left with was video footage of what looked like two glowing orbs (well it more like pulsated than just glowed). No explanation could be found as to what it was. Do you think it's possible for a Pterosaur to have survived after supposedly being dead for millions of years?


Source: 

Genesis Park

Blog Announcement

It was brought to my attention that a certain site was using feeds from different blogs, including my own, without possibly the owners knowledge. I believe this is an issue I've addressed before. I don't mind if someone wants to borrow material here as long as you give me credit for it. I deserve the acknowledgement for the hard work I do on this blog.

If you don't give credit where credit is due, you leave yourself open to possible legal issues. So, please give a link back.

I also have been setting up a MySpace page for Ghost Stories. The layout is pretty much finished (let me know what you think). All that is left is filling in the information. If you would like to add Ghost Stories to your list of friends, you are more than welcomed to. FYI, I have the page set to where you will need either my last name or email address in order to friend GS, attempting to keep out the spammers. Both pieces of information is on the left sidebar.

GS Question of the Week

Do you believe Angels intervene in our lives? Have you ever had a possible encounter with an Angel?

Alien Theme Park

What's the best place for an alien theme park? Roswell, New Mexico of course. City officials have decided to take the UFO craze to another level with an amusement park.

The park, dubbed Alien Apex Resort, is set to open as early as 2010. The city has received a $245,000 legislative appropriation for initial planning, but the park would be privately built and managed.

Bryan Temmer, concept designer, knew of only one place where this idea would work. The concept was pitched two years ago and said to possibly cost several hundred millions of dollars. The park will cover 60 to 80 acres with room to expand to 150 acres. Six sites have the potential for this grand theme park, but the city has declined to identify them. It will feature rides and attractions including an indoor roller coaster that would take passengers on a simulated alien abduction and an exhibit hall with scientific information on exploration of the universe.

Roswell achieved worldwide fame when supposedly a UFO crashed on a nearby ranch in 1947. The military denied such an incident took place stating it was a top-secret weather balloon. Like they would really confirm such a thing took place. It's so much more fun to keep everyone in the dark and call them crazy.

Some business owners believe the theme park is necessary to keep tourists returning. I guess you have to do what you have to do to keep your business going. Despite exploiting aliens and UFOs even further, amusement parks are always fun and this one doesn't sound any different.


Source: FoxNews.com

Paranormal Night

It seems Wednesdays have become paranormal nights on the Sci-fi channel.

Leading off the night was another excellent episode of Ghost Hunters. They investigated the Hellfire Caves. Lord Francis Dashwood provided work to unemployed farmers by hiring them to dig out the caves in the 1750s. It is believed that the inspiration for the design of the Caves came from his grand tour of Europe and the Ottoman Empire. On his return Sir Francis Dashwood founded the Hellfire Club (I believe it was called the Order of the Knights of St. Francis of Wycombe first) and became a leading member of the Dilettanti Society and the Divan Club. The Hellfire Club originally met at Medmenham Abbey on the River Thames. After this burnt down accidentally they reputedly then held many of their meetings in the Caves.

Sir Paul Whitehead and a woman in white were the ghosts to look for and TAPS may have contacted them. They recorded three EVPs, both male and female origin, as well as an interesting piece video footage. I'm not sure exactly what to make of it and neither did they. I guess it was something you just had to form your own opinion of what it could be.

Next on the lineup was a new show called Destination Truth. This particular program has sort of a documentary feel to it. Josh Gates travels all around the world for evidence in order to prove or debunk reports of supernatural or mysterious phenomena. It premiered last week with Josh in Papua New Guinea searching for proof that an Iguanodon and mermaids exist there. On that adventure, he came up empty handed. This week he was in Thailand investigating reports of the Naga, serpent-like creature much like the Loch Ness monster. Even though he didn't really find anything supporting local stories, he did get some evidence of a haunted cemetery, an EVP from inside a crematorium.

I'm not sure exactly how I feel about this show yet. It's humorous, but also professional. I guess I'll keep watching and see how it goes.

Last stop on this paranormal ride, is also a new Sci-fi special hosted by George Noory called Into the Unknown. If the name sounds familiar then you probably have listened to his radio show Coast to Coast AM. I have to admit that I didn't watch this one from beginning to end. I watched it up to when he had Gary Busey on talking about his near death experience. To be honest, I'm sort of a fan of his work, but I saw him on Celebrity Fit Club and now on this show and I don't understand half of what he says anymore. It's like he's become some kind of philosopher. I got some of what he said on CFC, but I didn't know what he was talking about on Into the Unknown.

I haven't done a lot of research on near death experiences. To someone who has been there and done that, it may have made sense to them, but not to me. Of course, I'm battling a cold right now. So, it could just be me. I'm not sure if Into the Unknown is a new TV series or a night only special. I'm sure you C2C listeners may know.

Aleister Crowley - Part II

In 1934, Crowley was declared bankrupt after losing a court case in which he sued the artist Nina Hamnett for calling him a black magician in her 1932 book, Laughing Torso. Mr. Justice Swift was in disbelief of the things he heard throughout the trial, especially coming from someone who claimed to be the greatest living poet. However, Patricia "Deirdre" MacAlpine approached Crowley on the day of the verdict and offered to bear him a child, a son named Aleister Ataturk. She sought no mystical or religious role in Crowley's life and rarely saw him after the birth, "an arrangement that suited them both".

During World War II, Ian Fleming, British author and Naval Officer, and others proposed a disinformation plot in which Crowley would have helped an MI5 agent supply Nazi official Rudolf Hess with faked horoscopes. They would then pass along the false information about an alleged pro-German circle in Britain. The government abandoned this plan when Hess flew to Scotland, crashed his plane on the moors near Eaglesham, and was captured. Fleming then suggested using Crowley as an interrogator to determine the influence of astrology on other Nazi leaders, but this plan was rejected by his superiors.

He had experimented with several types of drugs, but became addicted to heroin after being prescribed morphine for his asthma and bronchitis many years prior. His addiction influenced his 1922 novel Diary of a Drug Fend, but but the fiction presented a hopeful outcome of rehabilitation and recovery by means of Magickal techniques and the exercise of True Will. At the time of his death he was addicted to heroin, his narcotic of choice. Aleister Crowley died of a respiratory infection in a Hastings boarding house on 1 December 1947 at the age of 72. Ironically, his doctor, Dr. Thompson, died exactly twenty four hours after his death. Newspapers claimed Crowley put a curse on him after he refused to continue his opiate prescription.

Frieda Harris supposedly reported him saying, "I am perplexed" as his last dying words, though she did not see him at the very end. According to John Symonds, a Mr Rowe witnessed Crowley's death along with a nurse, and reported his last words as "Sometimes I hate myself". Biographer Gerald Suster accepted the version of events he received from a "Mr W.H." who worked at the house, in which Crowley died pacing in his living-room. Supposedly Mr W.H. heard a crash while polishing furniture on the floor below, and entered Crowley's rooms to find him dead on the floor. Patricia "Deirdre" MacAlpine, who visited Crowley with their son and her three other children, denied all this and reports a sudden gust of wind and thunder at the moment of his death. According to MacAlpine, Crowley remained bedridden for the last few days of his life, but was in light spirits and conversational.

Even though Aleister Crowley has passed on, his teachings have continued to influence modern Thelemites.


Source/Photo: Wikipedia

Aleister Crowley - Part I

A post requested by Piglet.

Born Edward Alexander Crowley, Aleister Crowley was a British writer, occultist and mystic with interests such as chess player, mountain climber, poet, painter, astrologer, hedonist, drug experimenter, and social critic. His father Edward Crowley maintained a lucrative family brewery business while his mother drew roots from a Devon and Somerset family. Both were Exclusive Brethren, a radical wing of the Plymouth Brethren. He was raised strictly in the Christian faith which provoked his skepticism.

In 1895, he went to Trinity College, Cambridge, after schooling at the public schools Malvern College and Tonbridge School, and originally had the intention of reading Moral Sciences (philosophy, psychology, and economics), but switched to English literature. His three years at Cambridge were happy ones, due in part to considerable fortune left by his father.

In December of 1896, following an event that he describes in veiled terms, Crowley decided to pursue a path in occultism and mysticism and began reading books by alchemists and mystics and books on magic. During the year of 1897, Aleister further came to see worldly pursuits as useless. A brief illness triggered considerations of mortality and "the futility of all human endeavor," or at least of the diplomatic career that Crowley had previously considered. He published Aceldama, a book of poetry and left Cambridge. He then met Julian L. Baker who introduced him to Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers (who would later become his enemy) and the Golden Dawn.

Involved as a young adult in the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, he first studied mysticism and made enemies of William Butler Yeats and Arthur Edward Waite, who were also members. Like many in occult circles of the time, Crowley voiced the view that Waite was a pretentious bore through searing critiques of Waite's writings and editorials of other authors' writings. In his periodical The Equinox, Crowley titled one diatribe, "Wisdom While You Waite", and his note on the passing of Waite bore the title, "Dead Waite".

Several decades after Crowley's participation in the Golden Dawn, Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers claimed copyright protection over a particular ritual and sued Crowley for infringement after Crowley's public display of the ritual. While the public trial continued, both Mathers and Crowley claimed to call forth armies of demons and angels to fight on behalf of their summoner. I wonder which was which. Both also developed and carried complex Seal of Solomon amulets and talismans.

While he did not officially break with Mathers until 1904, Crowley lost faith in this teacher's abilities soon after the 1900 schism in the Golden Dawn (if not before). Later in the year, Crowley travelled to Mexico and continued his magical studies in isolation where he supposedly discovered the word Abrahadabra.

Crowley said that a mystical experience in 1904, while on holiday in Cairo, Egypt, led to his founding of the religious philosophy known as Thelema. This religion existed long before Aleister Crowley in different forms, but he revived it when he dictated the words from a voice who he thought to be Aiwass or Horus. The text became known as The Book of the Law. He took Thelema as the name of the philosophical, mystical and religious system which he subsequently developed, which includes ideas from occultism, Yoga, and both Eastern and Western mysticism (especially the Qabalah).

Alesiter and his wife Rose had a daughter, whom Crowley named Nuit Ma Ahathoor Hecate Sappho Jezebel Lilith Crowley, in July of 1904. This child died in 1906, during the two and a half months when Crowley had left her with Rose (after a family trip through China). They had another daughter, Lola Zaza, in the summer of that year, and Crowley devised a special ritual of thanksgiving for her birth. Aleister and Rose divorced in 1909.

Crowley was notorious in his lifetime — a frequent target of attacks in the tabloid press, which labelled him "The Wickedest Man in the World". At one point, he was expelled from Italy after having established a commune with Leah Hirsig, the organization of which was based on his personal philosophies, the Abbey of Thelema, at Cefal├╣, Sicily.

The name was borrowed from Rabelais's satire Gargantua, where the "Abbey of Theleme" is described as a sort of anti-monastery where the lives of the inhabitants were "spent not in laws, statutes, or rules, but according to their own free will and pleasure". This idealistic utopia was to be the model of Crowley's commune, while also being a type of magical school, giving it the designation "Collegium ad Spiritum Sanctum", The College of the Holy Spirit. The general program was in line with the course of training, and included daily adorations to the Sun, a study of Crowley's writings, regular yogic and ritual practices (which were to be recorded), as well as general domestic labor. The object, naturally, was for students to devote themselves to the Great Work of discovering and manifesting their True Wills.


To Be Continued...

GS Question of the Week

If a creature inhabited a certain part of your town, would you sacrifice poor animals to keep it happy and away from the townspeople or find a way to capture/kill it?

Ghost Hunters' Evidence



I know I did a review of Wednesday's premiere, but I don't want you just to go by word. I found this videa clip of the evidence TAPS collected at the Lisheen Ruins. Watch it and form your own opinion of what you think it might be. The clip is only about three and a half minutes. It shouldn't take long to load.

Scrying

Many of you may have heard the word "scrying" before, especially if you were big fans of the CW show Charmed. Like most entertainment, it didn't show an accurate view of what it really is.
Scrying is a magic practice that involves seeing things supernaturally through a medium, usually for purposes of divination and fortune-telling. Scrying has been used in many cultures as a means of divining the past, present, or future. Depending on the culture and practice, the visions that come when one stares into the media are thought to come from God, spirits, the psychic mind, the devil, or the subconscious.

The most common media used were crystal balls also called shew stones (or stones/crystals called seerstones or peepstones), water or any liquid, and mirrors. Some specific objects used were a glass of sherry, liver of an animal, pool of ink in the hand, swordblade, fingernail and the burning of a poppy flowerbud on hot coals.

How does it work? If you're using water, the visions are suppose to come from the color, ebb and flow, or ripples produced by pebbles dropped in a pool. If the medium is a crystal ball, the visions may come from the tiny inclusions, web-like faults, or the cloudy glow within the ball under low light (e.g. candlelight) while in a self-induced trance. Smoke scrying is best done while relaxing in front of a fire. Do not follow the smoke up but rather allow the smoke to form patterns within your gaze. You will see visions of future events.

Most seers prefer using a black mirror. Simply take out the glass and paint it black. When you put it back in the frame make sure the glass part is to the front. When using the black mirror for scrying you do not want to see your reflection. Thus you should leave the mirror on a table and look at it from an angle. Look into the depths of the mirror as though you were looking into a bowl of water. At first it may appear grey than colors will come and go. With time and practice you will be able to see images. The visions may even exist outside the mirror, either surrounding it or surrounding the scryer.

Around 2,000 BC, Greece, as well as "early" Britain and its subsequent Celtic population, practised many forms of scrying using beryl, crystal, black glass, polished quartz, water, and other transparent or light catching bodies. Druids are one of the earliest known peoples to have used crystals in divination.

During central Europe's Medieval Period, diviners used crystals to see into the past, present, and future. Early crystal balls were made from beryl. However, later, they were replaced with rock crystal.

In 16th century Central Europe, Nostradamus was said to have used a bowl of water as a scrying aid. Dr. John Dee, a noted British mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, geographer and consultant to Queen Elizabeth I, and his assistant Edward Kelley employed a crystal ball which, including the wax tablets are displayed at the British Museum in London. John Dee also used a black mirror of obsidian.

According to the Hebrew Bible, Urim and Thummim (Hebrew for "revelation and truth") were used as a divination process. Many scholars believe they were two or twelve crystals used for scrying, but there are also other interpretations. The earliest reference is in Exodus 28:30, when Aaron carried them with him as High Priest.

Scrying is actively used by many cultures and belief systems. However, like other aspects of divination and parapsychology, it is not supported by mainstream science as a method of predicting the future or otherwise seeing events that are not physically observable.



Sources: Wikipedia (information and photo) and Spiritual.com.au

Ghost Hunters Premeire


Who saw last nights episode besides me? If you didn't, you missed out on a great show. I can't think of a better way to start off the mini-season.

The Taps team investigated the Lisheen Ruins in Ireland. Built in the 1800s, the house was owned by an archaeologist who had a major fascination in mummies. Seriously, he had them displayed all throughout his home. Can you imagine walking into someones house and they have actual dead bodies hanging up like decorations?

The Irish believe you should never build your home in the path of where fairies dwell. If you do then your house would become haunted. Keep in mind, here in the States and possibly other places, when we think of fairies, we immediately picture a little nymph-like person with wings that are good in nature. In Ireland, they are seen as troll-like creatures that you don't want to mess with.

During last nights episode, they were able to capture some tremendous evidence. Dave and Dustin were in the basement and heard footsteps like someone was walking on a hardwood floor when there wasn't one. Jason and Grant were filming using the thermal camera and caught three unknown things following a couple of the TAPS team members in the woods. While exploring the same woods, they also filmed something stepping out from behind a tree with the thermal camera. Neither could be explained. The last piece of evidence they caught on tape was a face. That's right a face. It sort of looked like what the Irish consider a fairy. Overall, an excellent night. I bet Steve was disappointed he couldn't be there.

TAPS also investigated the Viaduct Tavern in London which was built over a 17th century prison, a place where people were locked up with 15 or 20 people for simple offenses such as owing money. There wasn't any windows or ventilation and weren't given food or water. All they had was a small hole in the ceiling where they would actually reach up and grab people to get their attention. They didn't collect much evidence there. Only a few EVPs, but it adds to the stories and experiences.

Next week, TAPS will be investigating the Hellfire Caves in England where a satanic secret society held their "meetings". Should be interesting.

In other Ghost Hunters news, the show has been picked up for a fourth season which will begin next year. They're also doing another live Halloween show. Care to guess where the location is this time? I'll give you two hints: it's one of the most active haunted locations in the US and TAPS has investigated it before. Give up? It's Waverly Hills.

Don't know about you, but I'm counting down the days until Halloween.

Gravity Hills

Upon reading an essay on the Mad Ghouls website, I decided to take on the topic of gravity hills. The essay talked of an urban legend his father relayed to him when he was a small child living in New Jersey I presume. The legend including a jealous boyfriend who killed his girlfriend in cold blood and then fled the scene in his car. The apparition of the girlfriend made an appearance and pulled the guys car back up the hill. Of course, this woman supposedly haunts this hill 'til this day, reliving the same moment over and over. Even the stories of ghost children dying on railroad tracks has been associated with gravity hills. Although, technically, they don't work that way.

While some people believe they are paranormal in nature, it has more to do with an optical illusion than anything. It can trick you into thinking that a ball can really roll uphill or that you can stand at impossible angles. However, distortions in perspective and odd angles along with the shape of the surrounding terrain can easily fool the human eye and brain. You may think it has to do with some weird gravity anomaly, but trust me. In these areas, gravity is working normal as usual.

Despite the lack of the supernatural, no one says you can't still have some fun. Visit one of the many gravity hill sites across the world and test out your experimenting skills. To find one near you, the gravity hill entry on Wikipedia has a list for you to choose from.


Source: Paranormal @ About.com

GS Question of the Week

New video footage of Nessie has begun to circulate in the media and on the internet. Do you think this new piece of evidence further proves of the mythical creatures existance or adds to the mystery? Why?

Did Ya Know Friday

If your birthday is in September like mine then your birthstone is Sapphire. Did ya know the gem was used for healing and magic? Here are a few facts about the uses of Sapphires:

  • Sapphire is love's guardian. It is used to promote fidelity. It can also be used to promote chastity.
  • Because sapphire promotes peace, truth, and serenity, it's worn during meditation.
  • Sapphire is thought to banish fraud, and is used in litigation and legal matters.
  • When you have a fever or a nosebleed, sapphire is placed on the forehead to lessen the fever or nosebleed.
  • Sapphire was important to wizards and seers who used it to help interpret vision and prophesy.
  • The most important attribute of Sapphire was said to be that of protection against sorcery. It was thought to banish evil spirits and frighten devils. It would turn evil sorcery and negative spells back against the sender, provide advance warning of hidden dangers, and free the mind of the enchanted.
  • The Sapphire is also used to enhance the influences of Venus and and banish evil thoughts.
  • Sapphire is believed to offer healing properties for rheumatism, colic, and mental illness. It also lowers inflammation, hearing problems, cancer and burns.
  • It is considered an antidepressant and an aid to psychokinesis, telepathy, clairvoyance and astral projection.
"A maiden born when autumn leaves
Are rustling in September's breeze,
A Sapphire on her brow should bind;
To bring her joy and peace of mind."
 
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