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    "Death is no more than passing from one room into another." – HELEN KELLER

GS Question of the Week

What books on the subject of the paranormal have you read? Would you recommend it?

Old Show Brought Back to Life

Remember Unsolved Mysteries? It's making a come back! Yes I'm being serious. HBO Distribution plans to bring it back in October 2008. Care to guess which channel it will be appearing on? Spike TV!

The show is getting a makeover. It'll feature a new set, same music, recaps of old cases as well new cases, more stories per hour, new graphics, and yes a new host. Robert Stack can't host it from beyond the grave although that would be an interesting spin. Dennis Farina was the man chosen for the job.

Of course, since it is on a male-oriented cable network, the stories are set to be more male-oriented. I guess since it's been on a girly network for so long, it's time for men to get a taste of it. Although, when it was on Lifetime, I don't recall the stories being so feminized that they needed to be altered to attract the male viewing audience but whatever.

Unsolved Mysteries airs on October 13th at 5pm and 6pm ET. Let's see if the new modernize version lives up to the established brand.

Stonehenge Mystery Continues

There's no doubt about it. Stonehenge has remained a mystery for many years. The first excavation in over four decades took place between May 31st and April 11th with the promise of opening doors to answers for this enigma and it has done just that.

Radiocarbon-dating has established that Stonehenge was used as a cemetery from around its inception about 3000BC. This isn't a new theory. Previous archaeologists believed it to be a burial site also. However, they determined people were buried there only between 2700 and 2600BC. Professor Mike Parker Pearson also adds another idea to the pot. Not only were people buried there from about 3000BC but only the civilization's finest were laid to rest at Stonehenge. It may have been a grave site for the ancient British royals and other elite society members. But this isn't the only new theory.

Professor Tim Darvell believes Stonehenge was a place of healing. The chronically ill and crippled as well as those capable of healing flocked to the Neolithic stone circle from across western Europe. A number of sick or injured people were found buried there which may or may not contradict Professor Parker Pearson's theory. Not only were they traveling to the sacred site to be healed, they were also taking pieces of bluestone home to sustain the mystical powers. Analysis of plant material shows it may have also been a religious site as far back as 7200BC. That's almost 4,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Do you think it was a domain of the dead or a healing center? Were only the elite buried there or a social variety? Do you think more answers will be discovered in the future?

GS Question of the Week

How many types of shadow people are there?

Curse of the Hope Diamond

Is it really cursed? The first supposed curse death was that of a man named Tavernier. According to legend, he took a trip to India. While visiting, he stole the diamond from a statue of the Hindu goddess Sita. After selling the diamond, he was torn apart in Russia from a pack of wild dogs. This legend is more myth than fact.

There was a man named Jean Baptiste Tavernier. He was a French jeweler who in 1642 traveled to India. He bought, not stole, a 112 3/16 carat blue diamond which is believed to have come from the Kollur mine in Golconda, India. Twenty-six years later in 1668, he arrived back in France. King Louis XIV bought the blue diamond along with 1,166 others from Tavernier. He was made a noble and did die in Russia but at the age of 84, the cause of death is unknown.

The next legend claims the lives of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. The pair was beheaded during the French Revolution and the diamond was blamed. First of all, Louis XIV and Louis XV both owned the diamond before Louis XVI and nothing bad happened to them. Second of all, it was the French Revolution. A lot of people were beheaded during the Reign of Terror. While the two royals attempted to flee, the diamond was taken from them and placed in the Garde-Meuble. It was repeatedly robbed, but most of the crown jewels were recovered. However, the blue diamond didn't surface again until around 1813.

Another legend states the Hope family, in which the diamond is named after, went bankrupt because of the curse. Henry Philip Hope acquired the diamond around 1839. It got passed down from one family member to the next until it reached Lord Francis Hope in the late 1800s. Francis Hope petitioned the court twice to gain permission to sell the diamond. He had gambling debts and a high spending habit. The courts denied his request both times. In 1901, he was finally granted permission. The Hope family going bankrupt was more likely due to Francis Hope's living style than the curse.

The diamond switched hands many times once again, was reset into a new mounting and bought by Evalyn McLean. She considered it her good luck charm and wore it all the time. The concept of the diamond being cursed may have derived from her story. Her son Vinson died in a car crash at the age of nine, her daughter committed suicide when she was twenty-five and her husband was declared insane and was put into an mental institution until he died in 1941. That's a lot for one person to go through. In 1949, two years after her death, the Hope Diamond went on sell to settle debts from her estate. Harry Winston purchased it.

This is our last stop on the curse train, for this post anyways. Winston donated the Hope Diamond to the Smithsonian Institution in 1958. Many believe he did so to rid himself of the curse. The truth is he made the donation to be the focal point of a new gem collection and to inspire others to donate. The Hope Diamond remains on display at the Smithsonian for all to view and admire.

Do you think it's cursed?

Interviewed!

If you want to learn more about me, I was interviewed for Whispering Spirits. Please check it out: http://ghostwhisper.proboards29.com/index.cgi?board=talktotheauthors&action=display&thread=46

GS Question of the Week

If you could be any Greek god, who would you be and why?

Reminder Sunday

If you a personal experience you want to share or a topic you want to read about, please email me.

As you can see, I've changed the template. Thought it was time for something new and fun. Like or dislike it?

Did Ya Know Friday

If you really listen to some nursery rhymes, they sound more dark and disturbing rather than light cheery. Ring Around the Rosy a.k.a. Ring a Ring o' Roses is believed to be about the Bubonic Plague. If you examine each line, it kind of makes sense.

"Ring Around the Rosy" represented the skin lesions that appeared as a bright red ulcerated spot surrounded by a ring. The next line, "Pocket full of Posies", had more to do with superstitions than anything else. Back then, people burned, carried, or rubbed down their houses with all kinds of herbs. However, it is believed doctors carried around posies. They even filled the masks they wore with it.

There are some variations in the third line. Some say "Ashes Ashes" which is believed to refer to the burning of bodies. "Husha Husha" represented the quiet in towns due to death or desertion of three-quarters of the population. "Tishoo Tishoo" is suppose to mimic the sound of sneezing. However, this symptom wasn't common for the plague. "We All Fall Down" is an allusion to the depopulation of Europe or merely death.

This explanation of its origins could be true, right? The skeptics side sounds more plausible. One major discrepancy involves the date in which the rhyme first appeared. Some think it dates back as far as the 14th Century, but the first print version was discovered in 1881 Mother Goose version.

If it didn't symbolize the plague, then what was its meaning. Some folklorist believe it was a rhyme developed by children as a way to get around the prohibition of dance by the Protestants in the 19th Century. Play parties were organized where kids would play ring games. The words of the rhyme meant just what they said. "Ring Around the Rosy" symbolized the ring of children. "Husha Husha" is where they would fall silent. "We All Fall Down" is where they would all fall down.

If the second theory isn't more truer than the first then why would we continue to pass down a nursery rhyme about the plague?

9/11 Conspiracies

Today marked the seventh anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. This one single event rocked our nation to the core. Many people died as we sat back and watched in horror. When it came to finding the explanation for such a tragedy, no answer given would be accepted as the absolute truth among all Americans, seeing as the answer wouldn't be as big as the event. This was to be expected as it has been that way for many years.

I had planned on listing and making general comments about a few common 9/11 conspiracies, but decided not to. The problem is if someone chooses to challenge a piece of information they are told and in the process list misinformation to support their argument it is likely others will follow by spreading that misinformation. After doing some research, I realized that would have done exactly that. I don't want to be apart of the problem.

However, I will say this. It's okay to question what you are told. That's normal. But there is such a thing as going too far. I was watching a show on the History channel the other day about this very subject. Conspiracy theorists were presenting their views and experts were giving reasons why they are wrong. I'm the type of person who wants to hear both sides before choosing which one to stand on. Some of the reasons these people were giving for their theories was absurd. But on occasion, that is usually the case.

The bottom line is use common sense. Things aren't always what they seem. And whether we like it or not, sometimes the answer we seek isn't going to be the one we like.

GS Question of the Week

What is the Theory of Familiarization a.k.a. Paranormal Stimuli?

Reminder Sunday

This isn't a reminder as it is a FYI. I'm participating in National Novel Writing Month for the second time. I wasn't sure what to expect last time but I know what needs to be done this year. One item on my lists of preparations is writing and saving posts for the month of November. This blog isn't going dormant like last year.

If you have a specific topic in mind that I haven't covered here yet, email me with your request. If you have a story or a picture you want to share on my blog, now is as good of a time as any. Please....please....please let me know if the story your sending me is intended for the Saturday guest spot. If you don't, you'll get a nice email thanking you for sharing your experience with me and that's it. I appreciate hearing from readers but if you send me something, I need to know if it's for my eyes only or not. I don't have to post your name if you don't want me to. Just let me know.

I'm going to be posting reminders throughout the next two months. October 30th is the deadline. So, you have plenty of time.

Nessie on Film

No I'm not referring to Scotland's lake monster. I'm talking about Sweden's version of Nessie, Storsjoe. The exciting news is they claim to have caught Storsjoe on film or rather some live being. They have a video on their homepage. I'm not sure if it's the one they are so excited about. It looks like a thermal image of a snake moving in the water.

Currently, they have six cameras in and around the lake: two high resolution, one low resolution, one thermal and two underwater. One person is employed full time to review all the footage. Twenty more cameras are expected in the future. Sweden is very serious about solving the mystery of this sea monster and it doesn't hurt to capitalize off of its popularity in the meantime, right? There's even going to be a documentary about Storjoe set to air on the Sci-Fi Channel.

The first sighting dates back to 1635. It is described as being long, serpent-like with humps, a dog or cat-like face, smooth, shiny, slimy or scaly skin, gray or dark green and either ears or fins pressed down to the neck. Turn ons are heat and early bedtimes. Turn offs are annoying people always trying to take its picture. The Monster likes to eat potatoes and Swedish turnips. Yum!

If you like to do a little Storsjoe watching, they have it set up on their website (http://www.storsjoodjuret.nu/index.html) for all your viewing pleasure. I added the link to the sidebar with all the other ghost cams. So, you can do monster spotting whenever you like though I hear the best time for a chance to see it is between 4 and 7:30pm (their time).

Iron Island Museum

Buffalo's Iron Island Museum received its name due to being in a neighborhood surrounded by railroad tracks. In 1888, a wooden church stood where the museum is today. The building was converted to brick for a Methodist-episcopal congregation seven years later. It stood empty for a short period until becoming a funeral home in the late 1950s. The property changed owners once again about eight years ago when Mr. Anthony Amigone donated it to the Iron Island Preservation Society of Lovejoy, Inc. Since then, volunteers have experienced numerous amount of paranormal activity.

TAPS investigation began as always. Jason, Grant and Steve did a walk through with one of the volunteers followed by setting up their equipment in mentioned hot spots. This beginning episode of the mini-season was not a disappointing one. Kris William received a nice treat upon witnessing a first for her. Kristyn was in the middle of doing an interview when Kris saw a shadowy figure followed by a locked door open and close. The pair inspected the situation further and found no logical explanation for the shadow or the unlocked door.

Jason and Grant performed a K2 meter session in hopes of communicating with the ghost of a young boy named Jimmy who by the way was the son of the museum's curator I believe. The meter lit up in response to their questions but the two were left unsure if it was Jimmy doing the communicating or someone else. However, they abandoned the session when sounds of footsteps became present. Jason and Grant manage to discover where the footsteps were coming from, the attic. Grant climbed a ladder and popped his head into the entrance for the room. The footsteps could clearly be heard and spooked Grant when they headed straight towards him. Jason checked out the situation as well before asking Tango to actually crawl up into the room. By that time, the activity had ceased or so it seemed.

Tango attempted an EVP session in hopes of experiencing what Jason and Grant heard and saw. When nothing happened, he went into provoke mode (after asking for permission to curse). I have to saw this part of the show was HILARIOUS. I know he was trying to be professional but he had everyone cracking up. It was hard not to laugh. Upon leaving that attic, he assumed he most likely caught nothing, but after reviewing the evidence, the allege spirit was still in there with him. A very creepy EVP proved that.

Below is a video clip of the reveal. It includes three EVPs and the video footage of the door opening and shutting. Overall, a very eventful investigation.



For more information, pictures, and events via Iron Island Museum, please visit their website at www.ironislandmuseum.com

GS Question of the Week

What is your favorite paranormal TV show? Why?
 
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